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What Happens if You Take Too Many Supplements?

Taking too many vitamins can have a detrimental effect on your health – but not getting enough can have downsides as well. Learn more about what Dr. Weil says when it comes to getting the right amounts of vitamins, minerals and other supplements.

People often ask if they should be worried about getting too much of a particular vitamin. While supplements can help supply nutrients that may be deficient or missing in the diet, dosage can be the difference between benefit and harm. It is especially important to always read labels carefully and discuss your supplement regime with your physician, particularly when combining different multivitamins, multiminerals and fortified foods with similar ingredients, which can lead to a higher intake than is recommended.

To avoid any potential for toxicity or overdose, you may want to choose a supplement routine that is designed for you by a nutrition specialist and that takes overall dosages into account. The Weil Vitamin Advisor has three separate evaluations to ensure the proper dosages across a wide arrange of vitamins - try it today for your free recommendation.

Are You Deficient in Vitamin B7?

Also known as biotin, vitamin B7 is necessary for optimal health. Learn more about why you need it, and ways to get this vitamin!

Vitamin B7, also known as biotin, is a water-soluble nutrient necessary for several key metabolic functions.

Biotin is a co-factor in many enzymatic reactions, and serious complications can result from biotin deficiency, including diseases of the skin, intestinal tract, and nervous system. Biotin plays a role in:

  1. Regulating blood glucose levels and may help in decreasing insulin resistance and improving glucose tolerance in those with type 2 diabetes.
  2. Maintaining healthy hair and nails, and possibly in preventing birth defects.

I recommend 50 mcg of biotin as part of a B-complex that contains a full spectrum of B vitamins, including thiamine, B12, riboflavin and niacin. You can also obtain biotin from foods including organ meats, barley, brewers yeast, egg yolks, milk, royal jelly, whole soy foods, and wheat bran. Avocado, broccoli, cauliflower, cheeses, chicken, fish, legumes, mushrooms, nuts, pork, potatoes, and spinach also provide biotin and are nutritious parts of my Anti-Inflammatory Pyramid.