Office Hours: Monday - Thursday 9:00 am - 4:00 pm

Youthful Looking Eyes in 6 Steps

If eye wrinkles, puffiness or dark circles are bothering you, skip the invasive procedures and try these effective, natural techniques for firmer, brighter eyes!

  1. Don't resort to invasive procedures for youthful-looking eyes - try these simple steps:
  2. Wear sunscreen. Ultraviolet rays can weaken collagen, causing premature wrinkling and sagging.
  3. Invest in quality sunglasses. Look for ones that block out UVA and UVB rays.
  4. Don't smoke. It affects the blood supply that keeps skin tissue looking healthy and supple.
  5. Use a moisturizer for hydration.
  6. Consider a vitamin A cream, which can help prevent wrinkles and minimize ones you already have.
  7. Cool down inflammation around your eyes. Puffy eyes can be addressed with cucumber slices, cold spoons or chilled teabags.

 

3 Reasons You May Need More Vitamin D

Vitamin D is an essential nutrient, and odds are you don’t get enough. Find out why you need it, and how much to take.

Vitamin D is an essential micronutrient with a central role in maintaining health. I recommend prudent daily sun exposure to support the natural production of vitamin D in our skin as one of the best ways to get enough of this vitamin. Be certain that prudent means sun exposure without getting burned. But if, like many these days, you have few opportunities to go outside due to work, school or for other reasons, you may be at risk for vitamin D deficiency. Decreased or insufficient levels of vitamin D have been linked to:

  1. Suppressed immunity: Our innate systems of defense may not function efficiently without adequate vitamin D, allowing increased susceptibility to infectious agents.
  2. Increased risk of chronic disease: Low levels of vitamin D have been associated with a higher than normal risk of several health conditions.
  3. Heightened inflammation: Vitamin D is a key cofactor in regulating inflammation throughout the body.
  4. Speak with your doctor about checking your 25-hydroxy vitamin D level and find out if supplementing is recommended. I recommend 2,000 IU of vitamin D per day as a baseline level, more if you have depressed blood levels. Look for supplements that provide D3 (cholecalciferol) rather than D2 (ergocalciferol). The Weil Vitamin Advisor can help! QAA401588

 

6 Things to Know about Sunscreen

Protecting yourself from the sun is vital to minimizing the risk of melanoma, as well as premature skin aging. Use these guidelines for buying and applying sunscreen.

If you want protection from the sun, avoid its rays (particularly between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. standard time from April through September in the Northern Hemisphere); wear a wide-brim hat and sunglasses (make sure your sunglasses block at least 99 percent of UVA and UVB radiation); and use sunscreen. When it comes to the latter, consider these six guidelines for getting the most out of your sunscreen: 

  1. Choose sunscreens that offer "broad spectrum" protection - that means it will block UVB rays and some UVA. Look for zinc oxide, titanium dioxide, and Parsol 1789 among the ingredients, but do not use "micronized" or "nano" formulations.
  2. Buy sunscreen with a minimum SPF of 15. This will block about 93 percent of UVB rays. Higher SPF numbers won't necessarily give you that much greater protection, but tend to remain effective longer.
  3. Use it liberally. You need at least an ounce (the amount that would fill a shot glass) to cover your entire body.
  4. Apply sunscreen 15 to 30 minutes before going outdoors so that it can be absorbed into the skin.
  5. Be sure to reapply sunscreen every two hours and after every swim. No matter what the label says, one application of sunscreen won't last you all day and won't stay on if you're in and out of the water.
  6. Remember that solar exposure is the best way to maintain optimum vitamin D levels, so don't entirely avoid sunlight on your bare skin. Learn how to safely raise your "D" levels via prudent sun exposure.

How Often Do You Use Sunscreen? (Poll)

A recent Q&A discussed sunscreen and the best forms of sun protection while outside: Sunscreen Snafu? Check out the article and let us know when and how often you use sunscreen.

The Early Bird Stays Slim

If you’re watching your weight, you might consider getting up early and going outside. A new study from Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine showed that people whose exposure to bright natural light was mainly early in the day – between 8 a.m. and noon – had a lower body mass index than people whose light exposure occurs mostly in the late afternoon. All told, the difference in weight between early birds and not-so-early types could be as much as 30 pounds, stemming entirely from the influence and timing of their light exposure, the study found. The Northwestern researchers recruited 54 people, average age 30 who wore wrist monitors that tracked their light exposure and sleep time for a week. The study participants kept logs of what they ate and how often and how much they exercised. The researchers said that the light exposure could come from various sources, including through car windows. Bright light later in the day or at night has the opposite effect – it has been linked to obesity.

Sources:
Phyllis Zee et al, “Timing and Intensity of Light Correlate with Body Weight in Adults, PLOS One, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0092251