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Thumbs Down On Low-Fat Diets

Low-fat diets have been losing their luster for some time, and now an analysis from Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston and Harvard Medical School has shown that they don't lead to more weight loss than low-carb or more palatable Mediterranean diets. The researchers reviewed the results of 53 studies containing data on 68,128 adults and saw no difference between the average weight loss due to low-fat diets and higher fat diets. In fact, they concluded that reduced-fat diets led to weight loss only when compared to no diet at all, and resulted in less weight loss than low-carb plans (the review team pointed out that differences in weight change were only about 2.5 pounds). The low-fat diets included in the studies analyzed ranged from those that permitted only 10 percent or fewer calories from fat, to those allowing 30 percent or fewer fat calories. Because fat contains more than twice the calories per gram as carbohydrates and protein, the rationale for low fat diets has been that "reducing fat intake will naturally lead to weight loss," said research leader Deidre Tobias, noting that the evidence from the investigation "clearly suggests otherwise."