Office Hours: Monday - Thursday 9:00 am - 4:00 pm

5 Reasons You Shouldn’t Eat Farmed Fish

Wild-caught Alaskan salmon is a favorite food of many, but when buying salmon and other fish, it is important to know its origins. Farmed fish is not a better option than wild-caught fish. Most farmed fish:

  1. Have unfavorable ratios of anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty acids to pro-inflammatory omega-6 fatty acids – meaning you get less of the good omega-3s and more of the less healthy omega-6s.
  2. Are raised in crowded conditions that are unnatural – and to help prevent infection they are given antibiotics. This means the fish are likely to contain residues of pesticides, antibiotics and other synthetic compounds used to control diseases that occur when fish are crowded in pens.
  3. May have lower levels of protein - as much as 20 percent less - compared to wild fish, making it a less valuable source of this essential nutrient.
  4. May have higher concentrations of cancer-causing chemicals such as PCBs and dioxin.
  5. Are resource- and energy-intensive (it takes several pounds of feed fish to produce one pound of farmed fish) and do not protect dwindling wild stock.

Choose wild-caught salmon, especially from the Pacific fisheries - they are more sustainably fished and have a larger, more stable population. If wild-caught salmon is cost-prohibitive, canned salmon (choose products containing salmon from wild, not farmed, sources) is a good alternative.

Eating Anti-Inflammatory Made Simple
Take the guesswork out of a healthful diet with Dr. Weil on Healthy Aging. Our shopping and eating guides, over 300 recipes, tips and videos follow Dr. Weil's recommended anti-inflammatory principles for promoting better health, from head to toe. See what it's about - start your free trial today and save 30% when you join!

What Hemp Foods Have You Tried? (Poll)

A recent Q&A discussed the health benefits of hemps seeds and their high concentration of omega-3 fatty acids: How Healthy is Hemp? Check out the article and let us know if you have tried any hemp foods including hemp seeds and hemp milk.

Are Grapes Good For Your Heart?

Want to promote heart health? Look to the grapevine!

Whether you eat the fruit, seeds or skin; drink the juice; or sip on red wine, grapes can help reduce the risk of heart disease. These bright fruits are rich in polyphenols (naturally occurring plant compounds known to have antioxidant activity and other health benefits) including resveratrol, phenolic acids, anthocyanins, and flavonoids, which help to:

  1. Slow or prevent cell damage caused by oxidation, which is an important step in deterring the development of atherosclerosis.
  2. Reduce blood clotting and abnormal heart rhythms.
  3. Lower blood pressure in patients with hypertension.

Choose the darker colored varieties of grapes for the most polyphenol benefits and opt for eating the fruit or skins over juice when able.

Eating Anti-Inflammatory Made Simple
Take the guesswork out of a healthful diet with Dr. Weil on Healthy Aging. Our shopping and eating guides, over 300 recipes, tips and videos follow Dr. Weil's recommended anti-inflammatory principles for promoting better health, from head to toe. See what it's about - start your free trial today and save 30% when you join!

What Foods Do You Crave Most Often? (Poll)

A recent Q&A discussed food addiction and if it is the cause of obesity: Addicted to Food? Check out the article and let us know what foods you crave most often.

Sprouted Garlic’s Surprising Benefits

Don’t trash garlic that has begun to sprout – new research suggests that it may have more health benefits than fresh garlic. We know that the antioxidant effects of garlic can influence health in many positive ways - it has been used traditionally to address high blood pressure, and can help protect against heart disease. It has also found some utility in treating earaches, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), chronic fatigue syndrome, and diabetes. Historically, it was prized for it usefulness in colds and flu to boost the immune system, and has even been used to treat skin infections. The discovery that sprouted garlic may have more antioxidant potential than fresh bulbs comes from researchers in Korea who noted that sprouted beans and grains often have increased antioxidant activity and wondered if the same is true of garlic. After controlling the ripening conditions, they reported that garlic sprouted for five days had more measurable antioxidant effects than younger fresher bulbs, and that the sprouted variety has different metabolites, suggesting that it also makes different substances than fresh garlic. In lab tests, the research team found that extracts from sprouted garlic protected cells in a lab dish from oxidative damage and suggested that sprouting “may be a useful way to improve the antioxidant potential of garlic.”

Sources:
Joon-Sang Kim et al, “Garlic Sprouting Is Associated with Increased Antioxidant Activity and Concomitant Changes in the Metabolite Profile” Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, DOI: 10.1021/jf500603v

What Starchy Foods Do You Prefer? (Poll)

A recent Q&A discussed resistance starch and the role it plays in digestive health: Is Resistant Starch Good for You? Check out the article and let us know which starchy food your prefer most.

3 Reasons To Eat Leeks

Leeks aren’t just delicious - they have health benefits too! Part of the allium vegetable family (along with garlic and onions), leeks provide an elegant, subtle flavor that enhances everything from soups to stir fries. But they are more than flavor accents - leeks also:

  1. Provide manganese, vitamin B6, vitamin C, and folate
  2. May help promote healthy cholesterol levels, prevent atherosclerosis and high blood pressure
  3. May help stabilize blood sugar levels

You can use leeks by substituting them for scallions and green onions in many recipes. When buying, avoid larger leeks - they tend to be more fibrous - and instead choose ones that are 1.5 inches or smaller in diameter for their delicate texture and flavor.

Our Green Squash Soup recipe features leeks - try it today!

Eating Anti-Inflammatory Made Simple
Take the guesswork out of a healthful diet with Dr. Weil on Healthy Aging. Our shopping and eating guides, over 300 recipes, tips and videos follow Dr. Weil's recommended anti-inflammatory principles for promoting better health, from head to toe. See what it's about - start your free trial today and save 30% when you join!

Add These Produce Selections to Your Diet!

Small steps can go a long way when trying to implement healthy changes to your lifestyle. Begin introducing more produce to your diet, and you will soon feel the difference, head to toe.

Start by eating vegetable-based meals. A wide variety of vegetables in your diet can provide you with the protective phytonutrients that help modulate and enhance immune function, reduce chronic/unhealthy inflammation, maintain the body's healing system, boost antioxidant defenses, and more. Plus, they are good sources of fiber, which helps to keep your digestive system running smoothly. Vegetable soups, casseroles, salads, chilis, sandwiches, stews, kabobs, pasta sauces - the list of veggie-friendly meals goes on and on. Opt for organic produce and eat a variety of colors.

Next, add a serving of fruit or two to your day. For the same reasons you should eat more vegetables, you should eat more whole fruits. Start the day with some fresh fruit salad or add berries to your steal-cut oatmeal; eat a piece of fruit with your lunch; or make your desserts primarily fruit-based. Choose ones that are organic and eat a wide variety, including as many colors as you can. However, keep in mind that fruits and vegetables are not equal. Vegetables are generally higher in nutrients and lower in sugars than are fruits, and should form the bulk of your produce consumption.

What Mushroom is Your Favorite? (Poll)

A recent Q&A discussed the health benefits of some common mushrooms: Mushrooms for Good Health? Check out the article and let us know which mushroom is your favorite to eat.

Great News About Nuts

If you snack regularly on nuts, you may be prolonging your life. The latest study on this healthy snack found that individuals who ate a one-ounce serving of nuts daily (that amounts to 16-24 almonds, 16 to 18 cashews) reduced their risk of dying from any cause over three decades compared to people who didn’t eat nuts or ate fewer nuts. Researchers from Boston’s Dana-Farber Cancer Institute tracked nut consumption in some 119,000 Americans for 30 years, looking for how snacking on nuts might affect all causes of death as well as any link between nut consumption and certain health threats such as heart disease. The investigators reviewed the participants’ nut consumption when the study began and every two to four years afterward. During that period, more than 16,000 women and more than 11,000 men died. When the investigators compared study participants who ate nuts to those who didn’t, they found that eating seven one-ounce servings per week cut the risk of death from any cause by 20 percent. They also found that people who ate nuts were learner, had lower rates of obesity, lower cholesterol, less high blood sugar, and smaller waist circumferences. In addition, they ate more fruits and vegetables and exercised more than people who ate fewer nuts or didn’t eat nuts at all.

Source:
Charles S. Fuchs et al, “Association of Nut Consumption with Total and Cause-Specific Mortality,” New England Journal of Medicine, DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1307352